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Unless otherwise specified, all events below will be at 341 FSN (341 E 1st Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012).

FREE ADMISSION. Capacity is limited. Informal seating is available on a first come, first served basis.

Building History 3.0 Project Workshop:

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An interactive exploration of the Japanese American incarceration camps in Minecraft
Sunday, April 14
| 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
A UCLA Asian American Studies Center 50th Anniversary event
UCLA Center for EthnoCommunications and Visual Communications present the Building History 3.0 Project, an interactive web project for kids and families. Join us, as we use Minecraft to explore the camps and learn stories about the World War II incarceration of Japanese Americans. A trained instructor and Minecraft expert, Randall Fujimoto from GameTrain Learning will guide this interactive experience, along with STEM Coordinator, Educational Technology Specialist and high school teacher, Kim Bathker, project co-founder and Minecraft expert, Gabriel Tajima-Peña and project producer, Assistant Director of the UCLA Center for EthnoCommunications, Janet Chen.

Workshop is for all ages. The workshop is now full, but please RSVP here to join the WAIT LIST — we will email you if a space opens up.
For ages 17 and younger, please have your parent/guardian RSVP for you.
We will have another workshop on June 8, 11:00 am - 12:30 pm at the Little Tokyo Branch Library (203 S. Los Angeles St, LA, CA 90012). Please follow us on Facebook and Twitter @BH3project and Instagram @buildinghistoryproject or join our mailing list at www.buildinghistoryproject.com for updates.

For questions, please email Assistant Director of the UCLA Center for EthnoCommunications, Janet Chen at jchen@aasc.ucla.edu.

Please also visit our website www.buildinghistoryproject.com for fun, interactive activities, unique lesson plans, and visual resources, including videos, a graphic timeline and Minecraft worlds!

Creating Community Media Boot Camp: An EthnoCommunications Workshop

Saturday, April 20 | Session #1: 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM   |  Session #2: 1:30 PM - 4:30 PM
A UCLA Asian American Studies Center 50th Anniversary event
UCLA Center for EthnoCommunications, UCLA Asian American Studies Center and Visual Communications present a creating community media workshop, a boot camp to train storytellers using digital video filmmaking techniques. Learn to tell your own stories and spotlight your community’s unique perspectives. We encourage stories about diverse and marginalized cultures, peoples and histories. Our focus will be the documentary format (no narrative filmmaking will be discussed at this workshop). Join us to learn nonfiction storytelling, camera use, and video editing techniques. Instructors are professional filmmakers and experienced UCLA students from the EthnoCommunications creating community media course series. Instructors include:

Tadashi Nakamura, EthnoCommunications alum, UCLA lecturer, Emmy-nominated filmmaker
Victoria Chalk, 2019 Karen Schmeer Film Editing Fellowship Awardee “one of the most talented young documentary editors…” - Renee Tajima-Pena
Janet Chen, Assistant Director of the UCLA Center for EthnoCommunications; Filmmaker | Producer | Educator

Workshop is for all ages. The workshop is now full, but please RSVP here to join the WAIT LIST for session #1 (10:00am-1:00pm) OR session #2 (1:30pm-4:30pm) - we will email you if a space opens up.
For ages 17 and younger, please have your parent/guardian RSVP for you.

For questions, please email Assistant Director of the UCLA Center for EthnoCommunications, Janet Chen at jchen@aasc.ucla.edu.

Follow us on www.facebook.com/ethnocommunications/ for free screenings, events and updates!

“Families Belong Together” Quilt: Celebrate, Support, and Protest

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Sunday, April 21 | 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Presented with Nikkei Progressives
Nikkei Progressives will display the "Families Belong Together" quilt and celebrate with community artists who helped to create the squares at an evening social. There will be a short program to share the progress of the support work, report on where quilt has been displayed (Day of Remembrance 2019 at JANM and at Dilley, Texas detention center protest), plans for the future and how people can support.

Reawakening Capacity in Community Development

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Saturday, May 11 | 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Presented with WAPOW
When we mention “capacity," lots of things come to mind. One way to think about capacity is how individual assets such as time, skills, and health are leveraged towards public organizations, actions, and needs. Broadening capacity and reconnecting our assets is not always an easy conversation to have. Who gets the say on what to do and how? Who has the power to act? What has been done and does it work now? What do we do and who do we work with if it doesn’t? Come join WAPOW for an intimate seminar about stakeholdership, community change and regenerational action.

From Breaking Silence in 1981 to Winning Redress in 1988

Saturday, May 18 | 12:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Presented with Nikkei Progressives
After the community broke its silence about their incarceration during World War II at the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians (CWRIC) , the National Coalition for Redress/Reparations (NCRR) ,spent the next decade building and maintaining a grassroots movement for redress, despite the many ups and downs. This program will show photos and clips of those years when NCRR took the video of the hearings to community groups and churches to gain support for a redress bill, sent delegations to Washington DC and connected Japanese American redress to other struggles, such as the Hope Navajo land fight, Anti-Apartheid in South Africa and the campaign to overturn the fingerprinting of Koreans in Japan.

Los Angeles’ Little Manila

Sunday, May 19 | 11:00AM - 4:00PM
Presented with Asian and Pacific Islander Americans in Historic Preservation

PART 1. History of LA’s Little Manila | 11 AM - 12:30 PM
Learn about the first community formation of Filipino Americans in Los Angeles in the 1920s-1950s. Back then, Filipino immigrants came to Los Angeles looking for Little Manila. Join us in learning about the importance of Little Manila through a panel discussion with Filipino American scholars.
SPEAKERS (tentative): Linda Espana-Maram (CSU Long Beach), Michelle Magalong

PART 2. Mapping LA’s Little Manila | 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
Archival materials and research scholarship provides us with details on importance places that helped shape and build Little Manila. Learn how you can help in mapping these historic places on to our online crowdsourced mapping project.
SPEAKERS: Michelle Magalong

PART 3. Remembering LA’s Little Manila | 2:15 PM - 3:30 PM
Documenting and recognizing our historic places can help us remember what we have lost and unearth what is hidden. Learn about past efforts in designating Filipino Americans historic places in Los Angeles while exploring future opportunities to preserve and honor Los Angeles’s Little Manila.
SPEAKERS (tentative): Gerald Gubatan, Joselyn Geaga-Rosenthal, Bill Watanabe/Michael Okamura (Little Tokyo Historical Society)

Mountain Movers: Student Activism and the Emergence of Asian American Studies

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Saturday, May 25 | 4:00PM - 6:00PM
A UCLA Asian American Studies Center 50th Anniversary event
The UCLA Asian American Studies Center will celebrate the Southern California launch of Mountain Movers, a joint book publication with SF State and UC Berkeley on the founding of Asian American Studies (AAS) programs. This 50th Anniversary commemorative volume features the historical roots of Asian American studies at each of the three campuses with oral histories by original founders and students of AAS today. The program will feature poetry by Amy Uyematsu accompanied by bassist Taiji Miyagawa, reflections by Casimiro U. Tolentino and other founders, and voices from students of Asian American Studies today. Discussion to follow. Light refreshments will be served.

Click here to learn more about CENTERING THE MASSES.